Discrete, Computational and Algebraic Topology – University of Copenhagen

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Department of Mathematical Sciences > Research > Conferences > 2014 > DCAT2014

Discrete, Computational and Algebraic Topology

University of Copenhagen

November 10-14, 2014


Organized by Herbert Edelsbrunner (IST Austria/Duke U), Lisbeth Fajstrup (Aalborg U), Frank Lutz (U Copenhagen/TU Berlin), Konstantin Mischaikow (Rutgers U).

Scope of the workshop

The computation of algebraic invariants and other structural information is at the heart of

  • Discrete Topology/Topological Combinatorics (in theory)

as well as of

  • Computational Topology (in applications).

In this workshop, we aim at bringing together researchers with synergistic research interests from both areas to foster interaction and to exchange ideas on

  • homology calculations,
  • discrete Morse theory,
  • persistent homology,
  • complexity issues,
  • random and structural aspects

of simplicial/cell complexes of a theoretical origin or from applied topological data.

Venue

The event will take place at the Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and is hosted by the Center for Experimental Mathematics and the Centre for Symmetry and Deformation, with additional support by the Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation (NSSMC). You can find information for short term visitors including directions to the mathematics department here.

Invited speakers

  • Karim Adiprasito (Einstein Institute for Mathematics, Hebrew U, Israel)
  • Robert J. Adler (Electrical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology)
  • Paul Bendich (Duke U, USA)
  • Anders Björner (KTH Stockholm, Sweden)
  • Pavle Blagojević (FU Berlin, Germany)
  • Peter Bubenik (Cleveland State U, USA)
  • Gunnar Carlsson (Stanford U, USA)
  • Michael Farber (Queen Mary, U London, UK)
  • Alexander Gaifullin (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia)
  • Michael Joswig (TU Berlin, Germany)
  • Matthew Kahle (Ohio State U, USA)
  • Roman Karasev (MIPT, Russia)
  • Claudia Landi (UniMORE, Italy)
  • Jesper Michael Møller (U Copenhagen, Denmark)
  • Neža Mramor Kosta (U Ljubljana, Slovenia)
  • Marian Mrozek (Jagiellonian U, Poland)
  • Vidit Nanda (U Penn, USA)
  • Martin Raussen (Aalborg U, Denmark)
  • Francisco Santos (U Cantabria, Spain)
  • Primož Škraba (Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia)
  • John M. Sullivan (TU Berlin, Germany)
  • Uli Wagner (IST Austria, Austria)
  • Nathalie Wahl (U Copenhagen, Denmark)

Slides from talks

Schedule and abstracts

Schedule.
List of abstracts.

Poster session

List of posters.

Participants

List of participants.

Accommodation

Participants---not including invited speakers---are asked to arrange their own accommodation.  We recommend Hotel 9 Små Hjem, which is pleasant and inexpensive and offers rooms with a kitchen. Other inexpensive alternatives are CabInn, which has several locations in Copenhagen: the Hotel City (close to Tivoli), Hotel Scandinavia (Frederiksberg, close to the lakes), and Hotel Express (Frederiksberg) are the most convenient locations; the latter two are 2.5-3 km from the math department. Somewhat more expensive---and still recommended---options are Hotel Nora and Ibsen's Hotel.